Peach Cobbler

$7.15 recipe / $0.89 serving
by Monti - Budget Bytes
4.75 from 4 votes
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This buttery old-fashioned Peach Cobbler hits! Juicy summer peaches and a crispy cake-like topping will always be a crowd-pleaser, which is why this homemade Peach Cobbler recipe is perfect for any occasion, from a simple weeknight dessert to the star of the potluck. Plus, you can make it with fresh, canned, or frozen peaches, so it’s an easy recipe that’s also easy on your wallet! (It comes in at under a dollar a serving! Woot!!)

Overhead shot of peach cobbler with a scoop taken out in a glass pie plate.

What Is Peach Cobbler

Peach Cobbler is often credited as a dessert created in the American South, but it’s actually Native American in origin. This dish of sweet, juicy summer peaches baked with a simple buttery batter is so easy to make and so yummy it’s almost criminal. Be warned: it smells so good that your loved ones will beg to devour it straight from the oven. Let it rest a few minutes before you dig in because it’s LAVA HOT. I speak from experience.

Ingredients For Peach Cobbler

You might want to double this recipe for Peach Cobbler because it will go fast, and you might have some feelings about that. I recently had two teenagers destroy the whole thing before I finished my first serving. I was inundated with waves of deep resentment while the teens went off to play something called Grand Theft Auto, as if there hadn’t been enough thieving already. This is what you’ll need to make my easy Peach Cobbler recipe:

  • Peaches– are the star of the show here. You can use fresh, canned, or frozen. You don’t have to peel your peaches if you don’t want to. It’s a textural thing for me. If using canned, get them in their own juices, and don’t discard the juices. If they are canned in syrup, again, keep the juices, but omit the brown sugar in the recipe. If using frozen, let them thaw before mixing with the other ingredients.
  • Sugar – helps sweeten the batter and the filling and deepens the color of the crust. You’ll use brown and granulated, though if you only have one type, use what you have. This recipe is very forgiving.
  • Spices – cinnamon pairs beautifully with peaches, adding a gentle dimension to the flavor profile of the batter. I also use a touch of ground ginger on the peaches and a pinch of nutmeg in the batter to create deeper flavors, but if your peaches are super tasty, feel free to skip them both.
  • Lemon Juice– adds much-needed acidity to the sweet filling and helps thicken the peach juices. You can use fresh or bottled.
  • Cornstarch– helps thicken the peach juices while keeping them clear and glossy. If you don’t have cornstarch, thicken the juices with 2 teaspoons of all-purpose flour. FYI, the flour might make the juices a little cloudy.
  • All Purpose Flour– creates the batter for the cobbler. We have not tested this recipe with gluten-free flour and can’t give any specific guidance, though I bet it would be tasty with almond flour. I’d use 1:1 almond flour to AP flour and add an egg to the batter to help with binding. Again, this was not tested, just my two cents as a massive food nerd.
  • Baking Powder – leavens and aerates the batter. If you don’t have baking powder, use 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and add a tablespoon of lemon juice to the cup of milk called for in this recipe.
  • Almonds – pair incredibly with peaches and add texture to the cobbler. While I use sliced, feel free to use chopped. You can substitute the almonds with pecans or walnuts. Skip the almonds if you have a nut allergy or if they’re not as budget-friendly as you’d like.
  • Milk and Butter– create the batter. The fat in the milk keeps the crumb velvety, so use whole or add a tablespoon more butter if you’re using 2% milk. If you want to keep things vegan, use plant-based butter and milk.
  • Vanilla – scents the batter but can also be skipped if you don’t have any on hand.
Overhead shot of a scoop of peach cobbler in a white bowl topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

What To Serve WitH Peach Cobbler

Warm Peach Cobbler pairs perfectly with our easy recipe for No-Churn Strawberry Ice Cream or double down on that peach flavor and make our amazing No-Churn Balsamic Peach Ice Cream. You can also drizzle it with our Easy Caramel Sauce or a few tablespoons of silky Blueberry Sauce. I love it topped with our Homemade Whipped Cream and Small Batch Crunchy Candied Walnuts.

How To Store Peach Cobbler

Peach cobbler is good for up to three days. Since it contains dairy, you’ll want to refrigerate it after it cools in an air-tight container. If you have leftovers, try to enjoy them within a day, as the flavors and textures dull quickly. You can also freeze peach cobbler. Cool it before storing it in an air-tight container with parchment paper on the surface. It will keep for up to 3 months.

How To Reheat Peach Cobbler

It’s best to reheat peach cobbler in a 350°F oven until steaming. If reheating from frozen, it’s fine to put the cobbler in the oven straight from the freezer. While you can reheat peach cobbler leftovers in a microwave, the texture of the cobbler will change. If you choose to go the microwave route, heat it in 30-second increments until steaming.

Side shot of peach cobbler with a scoop taken out in a glass pie plate.
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Peach Cobbler

4.75 from 4 votes
This buttery peach cobbler hits! You can use fresh or canned peaches, which makes this easy peach cobbler recipe a crowd and wallet-pleaser!
Overhead shot of peach cobbler with a scoop taken out in a glass pie plate.
Servings 8 servings
Prep 15 minutes
Cook 50 minutes
Resting Time 10 minutes
Total 1 hour 15 minutes

Ingredients

Filling

  • 6 peaches*, peeled and cut into 3/4 inch slices ($2.76)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar ($0.22)
  • 1/4 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1/8 tsp ground ginger ($0.02)
  • 1 tsp cornstarch ($0.04)
  • 1 tsp lemon juice ($0.03)

Batter

  • 8 Tbsp salted butter, melted ($1.02)
  • 1 1/2 cups flour ($0.21)
  • 1 cup sugar ($0.40)
  • 1/2 cup sliced toasted almonds ($1.27)
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking powder ($0.09)
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon ($0.02)
  • 1 pinch nutmeg ($0.01)
  • 1/4 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1 cup milk ($0.30)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract ($0.72)
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Instructions 

  • Set an oven rack in the middle of the oven and preheat it to 350°F. In a large bowl, mix the sliced peaches, brown sugar, salt, and ground ginger. Let the peaches sit for five minutes to absorb the sugar and spices and release their juices.
  • Set a large skillet over medium heat and add the peaches and their juices. Cook down the juices for about 5 minutes. Mix the cornstarch with the lemon juice to create a slurry, then add it to the peaches and stir well. Turn the heat to mid-high and bring to a boil.
  • When the juices have thickened to the point that they stay separated when you run a spoon through them (about 5 minutes), take the pan off the heat.
  • Add the melted butter to a pie dish, then add the cooked peaches and their juices.
  • In a large bowl, mix the flour, sugar, sliced toasted almonds, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt.
  • Stir in the milk and vanilla and mix lightly, just until a batter forms. Pour the batter on top of the peaches. For a solid crust, leave the batter as is. If you'd like some of the peaches to poke through the crust, stir the batter into the peaches once or twice.
  • Bake the cobbler in the preheated 350°F oven until the crust is golden brown, about 35 minutes. Cool before serving and enjoy!!

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Notes

*You do not have to peel the peaches if you don’t want to. If using canned peaches, use two 15-ounce cans of peaches in their own juices. Do not drain the juices. If using frozen sliced peaches, use 2 pounds, but thaw them before mixing them with the brown sugar.

Nutrition

Serving: 1servingCalories: 443kcalCarbohydrates: 71gProtein: 6gFat: 16gSodium: 346mgFiber: 3g
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How to Make Peach Cobbler – Step by Step Photos

Overhead shot of peaches and brown sugar with other filling ingredients in a white bowl.

Set an oven rack in the middle of the oven and preheat it to 350°F. In a large bowl, mix the 6 sliced peaches, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger. Let the peaches sit for five minutes to absorb the sugar and spices and release their juices.

Overhead shot of of cornstarch slurry being added to peaches in a silver pan.

Set a large skillet over medium heat and add the peaches and their juices. Cook down the juices for about 5 minutes. Mix 1 teaspoon of cornstarch with 1 tablespoon of lemon juice to create a slurry, then add it to the peaches and mix in well. Turn the heat to mid-high and bring to a boil.

Overhead shot of of peaches being cooked in a silver pan to thicken their juices.

When the juices have thickened to the point that they stay separated when you run a spoon through them (about 5 minutes), take the pan off the heat.

Overhead shot of cooked peaches being added to butter.

Add 8 tablespoons of melted butter to the pie dish and add the cooked peaches and their juices to the dish.

Overhead shot of wet ingredients being mixed into dry ingredients.

In a large bowl, mix the 1 1/2 cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 1/2 cup sliced toasted almonds, 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 pinch nutmeg, and 1/4 teaspoons salt. Stir in 1 cup milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla and mix lightly, just until a batter forms.

Overhead shot of raw peach cobbler in a glass pie plate.

Pour the batter on top of the peaches. The butter will rise to the top. I prefer a buttery, crispy topping, so I don’t stir the batter into the peaches. If you’d like to have some of the peaches popping through the topping, mix it lightly into the peaches.

Overhead shot of baked peach cobbler in a glass pie plate.

Bake the cobbler in the preheated 350°F oven until the crust is golden brown, about 35 minutes. Let it cool for a few minutes before serving and collecting ALL OF THE COMPLIMENTS. For the most amazing experience, top it with ice cream or whipped cream!

Overhead shot of a scoop of peach cobbler in a white bowl topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

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  1. I really wish that the recipe said what size pie dish. I looked through several times and all I see is “a glass pie dish” so I used my 9″ glass pie dish thinking it would work. Luckily I looked at reviews beforehand and preemptively put a cookie sheet underneath my pie dish. The ingredients don’t fit in a 9″ dish, so I definitely recommend either using less of something or using a larger dish if you make this recipe. Seems like it’ll be tasty, but it’s going to be a huge mess too!

    1. It looks like you didn’t check the equipment list. The pie dish link takes you to a 3qt dish, which is 9.5″.

  2. I made the cobbler with fresh peaches; it is delicious! I forgot to add vanilla to the batter, but it was still very, very good. The rest of the peaches are in the freezer—I’ll look forward to peach cobbler this winter.

  3. Was delicious but totally boiled over the pie dish and into the oven. Lol no idea if I did anything wrong (I reread the recipe and couldn’t find anything) but we have sugary butter at the bottom of our oven now, still amazing XD

  4. Just a note, the recipe lists cornstarch and the juice as 1 tsp each, but the illustrated part says 1 tsp and 1 tbsp, so if you could verify which one is wrong, that would be good

  5. Omg, I made your blistered green bean bowl and this peach cobbler for dessert. It was beyond perfect with a hot cup of black coffee! The only change I made was not peeling the peaches. Otherwise, I followed the recipe faithfully and it was excellent! The toasted almonds really give it an extra nice texture and flavor. I’m so glad I found this site and I appreciate that every single recipe I’ve made from here never misses. Thank you so much! ❤️

  6. “Peach Cobbler is often credited as a dessert created in the American South, but it’s actually Native American in origin.”

    This is incorrect. Cobblers originated in the British American Colonies when the settlers were unable to make traditional suet puddings, as they lacked the ingredients and proper cooking equipment to do so. In order to make do, they covered stewed fillings with uncooked plain biscuits, scone batter, or dumplings.

    The cobbler’s forebearer, the pie, is shown in records dating back to the rule of Ramesses II, and Sumerian tablets dating back to 2,000 BC.

    Peaches themselves were brought to the Americas in the 15th century. However, after their introduction they were only intentionally cultivated starting in the 1850s, being a feral plant that was gathered opportunistically prior to that.

    1. Hi Jijitsu, Cobblers did originate in the colonies. However, it was the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto who came many years before the colonists, that is believed to have introduced two species that came to define the south: hogs and peaches. They were not cultivated in any sense but planted in the wild in the hopes that on the return trip there would be crops and meat to harvest. Native American cooks were the first to use those wild peaches in a cobbler.

      1. Do you have sources for that? According to Wikipedia, peaches developed in China and reached Europe by 300 BC. That article–with a very long bibliography–references an article by Kathryn C Taylor (Taylor, Kathryn. “Peaches.” New Georgia Encyclopedia, last modified Sep 26, 2018. https://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/arts-culture/peaches/) who states that Franciscan monks brought peaches to St Simon and Cumberland islands along the Georgia coast in 1751 and goes on to mention that they were later cultivated by the Cherokee. While then researching “cobbler,” I see that it’s been a British “pudding” for centuries, using all sorts of fruits and brought to the colonies by early British settlers. I don’t know what native Americans would have used to make a batter prior to the settlement of North America. They did have wild rice and corn, but the introduction of wheat seems to have generated bread products across the new world.

      2. While I love wikipedia as a reference, I am using lectures of food historians as reference. Specifically lectures about the ignored contributions of people of color (IE Native Americans and enslaved Africans) when it comes to white-washed food history, especially that of the South. For example- pies where actually first created by Egyptians in Africa- not the British. Franciscan monks are Spanish and they travelled with Spanish conquistadores,(Gold God and Glory). They cultivated and traded food and taught natives. I’ve got to get back to work now. You have a great day.

      3. typo–the date should have been 1571, not 1751. In any case, 30 years after the death of DeSoto.

    1. As we have not tested with blackberries, I have no definitive answer. I would try 2 pounds, and def cook down as they release more juice than peaches. Again, this has not been tested and I can’t tell you about thickener amounts or spices.