SNAP Challenge: Peanut Butter Hummus

If you don’t know already, I’m a hummus fanatic. I eat it on and in everything. I make several different flavors and I basically just can’t get enough. For that reason, I thought it would be a good idea to use the second half of the chickpeas that I cooked in week one to make a batch of hummus. It’s a great item to have in your fridge for a variety snacking and meal needs. It’s just so versatile, which is what you need when working on a restricted budget.

I do happen to have some tahini in my fridge, but for the sake of the SNAP Challenge, I decided to try a more budget friendly hummus, sans tahini. People have been telling me for years to sub peanut butter for tahini in hummus, but I’m a bit of a hummus snob and I just couldn’t get down with the idea. To me tahini is what makes hummus hummus. That slightly bitter flavor is the difference between a chickpea-garlic-lemon purée and heavenly hummus. But hey, it’s important to try new things. So, in the spirit of being flexible for a restricted budget’s sake, I made the notorious peanut butter hummus.

How did it turn out? Not bad! I ate it happily all week. Was it my beloved “OMG I’m in heaven” hummus? No. But I think if I really was on a super restricted budget, I’d definitely make this. Not only is the peanut butter less expensive than tahini, but buying a jar of peanut butter might be more practical because it has more uses. Sure, I use my tahini for a lot of things, but most people wouldn’t, so it might sit in the back of their fridge unused. If you’re that person, definitely try the peanut butter hummus. And what about the flavor? Instead of being slightly bitter, it’s almost slightly sweet (my PB did not contain sugar), with a faint peanutty aroma. Not the same, but not bad, either.

So, here it is. The super simple, extremely versatile Peanut Butter Hummus!

Peanut Butter Hummus - Budgetbytes.com

5 from 2 votes
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SNAP Challenge: Peanut Butter Hummus

A budget friendly hummus that replaces tahini with peanut butter. Get that creamy, nutty flavor without the high price of tahini and unused leftovers.

Total Cost $2.24 recipe / $0.45 serving
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 5 1/2 cup each

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked chickpeas (1/2 lb. dry) $1.32
  • 2 Tbsp natural style peanut butter $0.23
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil $0.48
  • 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp lemon juice $0.23
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled $0.08
  • 1/2 tsp salt $0.03
  • 1/2 tsp cumin $0.05

Instructions

  1. Drain and rinse the chickpeas briefly. Add the chickpeas, peanut butter, olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and cumin to a food processor.
  2. Process the ingredients until smooth. Taste the hummus and adjust the lemon and salt to your liking. Store refrigerated for up to one week.

Recipe Notes

You can make hummus in a blender, but you'll need more liquid for it to blend properly. Either add more olive oil or a few Tbsp of water to help get it going. The end product will be more loose than my paste-like hummus.

Make sure you use natural peanut butter with no sugar added. You may need to adjust the salt recommendation in the recipe based on whether or not your peanut butter contains salt. My peanut butter DOES contain salt.

Peanut Butter Hummus - Budgetbytes.com

 Step by Step Photos

Peanut Butter Hummus Ingredients

Add 3 cups of rinsed and drained chickpeas to a food processor along with 2 Tbsp natural peanut butter, 3 Tbsp olive oil, 5 Tbsp lemon juice, 1 clove of peeled garlic, 1/2 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp cumin. I used half of my chickpeas that were cooked in a slow cooker last week, which would be about 1/2 lb. dry. You can sub 2 15-oz. cans of chickpeas if you don’t plan to cook your own.

Peanut Butter Hummus - Budgetbytes.com

Process the ingredients until it is smooth. Taste the hummus and adjust the salt and lemon to your liking. Hummus flavor is a very personal preference, so use my ingredient guidelines above loosely. You may like a more or less lemony hummus, or prefer more salt. Feel free to tweak it.

Peanut Butter Hummus - Budgetbytes.com

I ate my hummus with some red peppers that I scored on sale and on breakfast sandwiches. I bet if I had added sriracha, it would have been even better and the difference from tahini hummus even less noticeable!

You can make hummus in a blender, but you’ll need more liquid for it to blend properly. Either add more olive oil or a few Tbsp of water to help get it going. The end product will be more loose than my paste-like hummus.