Sweet Potato Biscuits

$3.06 recipe / $0.31 each
by Beth - Budget Bytes
4.79 from 19 votes
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It’s fall, and that means that I’m working sweet potatoes and pumpkin into everything. Why? They provide a subtle sweetness, a vibrant orange color, and a dose of extra nutrients. And in the case of these Sweet Potato Biscuits, the sweet potatoes keep the biscuits deliciously moist and tender. I think you’ll love these Sweet Potato Biscuits because they’re still super simple to make, and are a fun twist on the usual for your weekend breakfast, or even Thanksgiving dinner.

Originally posted 10-11-11, updated 10-12-2019.

Sweet Potato Biscuits on a wire cooling rack and a couple biscuits on a plate, one open and smeared with butter

What do They Taste Like??

They taste like classic biscuits, but with a very subtle earthy sweetness. The small amount of nutmeg in the dough also gives the biscuits a warm, autumn flavor. They’re like regular biscuits, but extra special.

What Do You Serve with Sweet Potato Biscuits?

Because these biscuits are not overwhelmingly sweet, I think they’d go great served in either a sweet or savory meal. They’re great for breakfast, with eggs and sausage, or just smeared with butter and maple syrup (or honey). But they’d also be great as a side dish with a pot roast, chili, or even with Thanksgiving dinner.

Close up of two sweet potato biscuits on a plate, one open, smeared with butter, and drizzled with maple syrup

Can You Freeze Sweet Potato Biscuits?

Absolutely! Biscuits are great for freezing. If you are cooking for yourself and don’t want the challenge of eating ten biscuits in the next few days, feel free to freeze half. You can freeze your sweet potato biscuits either before or after baking. 

To freeze before baking, freeze them first on a parchment lined baking sheet, then transfer to a freezer bag once solid. You can then bake one or more as needed, straight from the freezer. They’ll just need a few extra minutes of bake time.

To freeze after baking, make sure they cool completely to room temperature first. Once cooled, place them in a freezer bag, then toss them in the freezer. They’ll be good in the freezer for about three months.

Do I have to Use a Microwave for the Sweet Potato?

Nope. I used the microwave to cook the sweet potato because it was fast and easy. You can definitely bake the sweet potato, if you like, but that will add about 45 minutes to the time needed to make this recipe (bake 400ºF for about 45 minutes, or until it is soft all the way through). You can also peel, dice, and boil the sweet potato, but keep in mind that this will add a lot more moisture to the biscuit dough, so you may need less milk to make the dough the correct consistency.

Golden brown sweet potato biscuits on the baking sheet, seen from the side.

Sweet Potato Biscuits

4.79 from 19 votes
Sweet Potato Biscuits are a unique and subtly sweet twist on a classic, the perfect fall touch for your weekend brunch or Thanksgiving dinner!
Close up of two sweet potato biscuits on a plate, one open, smeared with butter, and drizzled with maple syrup
Servings 10
Prep 15 mins
Cook 25 mins
Total 40 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. sweet potato ($1.29)
  • 2.25 cups all-purpose flour, divided ($0.23)
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder ($0.12)
  • 1 Tbsp sugar ($0.02)
  • 3/4 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg ($0.02)
  • 8 Tbsp butter, frozen (1 stick) ($1.04)
  • 1 cup whole milk ($0.32)

Instructions 

  • Use a fork to prick the skin of the sweet potato several times. Place the sweet potato on a microwave safe plate, then microwave on high for 5 minutes. After five minutes, use the fork to pierce the sweet potato in the thickest part. If it's not very soft all the way through, microwave for an additional 1-2 minutes, or until the center is very soft.
  • Carefully remove the sweet potato from the microwave (the plate will be VERY hot). Use a towel to grasp the sweet potato as you cut open the skin and scoop out the flesh. Scoop out one packed cup of sweet potato and place it in a medium bowl. Use the fork to mash the sweet potato until smooth. Set it aside to cool further.
  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. In a separate large bowl, combine 2 cups of the all-purpose flour (reserving the last 1/4 cup for later), baking powder, sugar, salt, and nutmeg. Stir until these ingredients are very well combined.
  • Use a cheese grater to grate the frozen butter into the bowl with the flour mixture. Take care to guard your fingers and knuckles when you get down to the end of the stick of butter. Stir the grated butter into the flour mixture until they are evenly combined.
  • Add the milk to the bowl with the mashed sweet potato. Stir or whisk the sweet potato and milk together until they are well combined. A few small chunks of sweet potato are okay.
  • Finally, pour the sweet potato and milk mixture into the bowl of flour and butter. Stir to combine the wet and dry ingredients until one cohesive ball of dough forms. Because sweet potatoes can vary in moisture content, you may need to add extra flour or milk to the dough to get the right consistency. The biscuit dough should be slightly sticky, but not so wet that it is glossy, and no dry flour should remain on the bottom of the bowl. If the dough is too dry (not forming a single ball of dough) add a couple tablespoons of milk. If it's too wet, dust it liberally with the reserved flour.
  • Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface. Press it down into a flat circle, about 1-inch thick. Use a biscuit cutter or a drinking glass to cut biscuits from the dough. Gather up the dough scraps, reshape them into a 1-inch thick circle, and cut more biscuits. Repeat this until no more dough remains. Place the cut biscuits on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Bake the biscuits for about 20 minutes, or until they are golden brown on top. Serve warm, with butter or maple syrup.

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Nutrition

Serving: 1ServingCalories: 233.57kcalCarbohydrates: 31.11gProtein: 4.29gFat: 9.94gSodium: 356.33mgFiber: 1.91g
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Love sweet potatoes? ME TOO! Check out some of my other favorite sweet potato recipes: Baked Sweet Potato fries with Peanut Lime Dressing, Streuseled Sweet Potatoes, Chorizo Sweet Potato Enchiladas, Sweet Potato Casserole Baked Oatmeal, or Sweet Potato Tacos with Lime Crema.

A hand picking up half of a sweet potato biscuit, smeared with butter and drizzled with maple syrup

How to Make Sweet Potato Biscuits – Step By Step Photos

A fork pricking a raw sweet potato

Start by pricking a one pound sweet potato several times with a fork. This allows steam to escape the sweet potato as it cooks, which will prevent it from exploding in the microwave.

Fork poking a cooked sweet potato on a plate

Place the sweet potato on a microwave safe plate and cook on high for 5 minutes, or until it is tender all the way through. You can test the sweet potato by poking it again with the fork in its thickest spot. The fork should pierce the sweet potato easily. If it’s still hard in the center, microwave for 1-2 minutes longer. Carefully remove the sweet potato from the microwave (the plate will be HOT). Let it cool slightly.

one cup of mashed sweet potato in a bowl, a measuring cup on the side

Carefully scoop one cup of the sweet potato flesh out into a bowl (use a towel to hold the hot sweet potato as you scoop). Mash the sweet potato until it is mostly smooth.

Milk being poured into the bowl with the mashed sweet potato

Add one cup whole milk to the mashed sweet potato, then stir or whisk until it is mostly smooth. A few small chunks of sweet potato is fine.

Dry ingredients in a white bowl

Begin preheating the oven to 400ºF. In a large bowl, combine 2 cups all-purpose flour, 1 Tbsp baking powder, 1 Tbsp sugar, 3/4 tsp salt, and 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg. Stir the ingredients together until they are very well combined.

Grated frozen butter added to bowl of dry ingredients, cheese grater on the side

Grate one stick (8 Tbsp) of frozen butter into the flour mixture. Stir until the grated butter is well combined with the flour mixture. The small pieces of butter throughout are what will make the biscuits a little flakey.

Wet and dry ingredients being stirred together

Pour the milk and sweet potato mixture into the bowl of dry ingredients and stir until a cohesive ball of dough forms. Sweet potatoes can vary in their moisture content, so you may need to adjust the flour or milk to get the right texture dough.

Finished sweet potato dough

The sweet potato biscuit dough should look like this. Shaggy, sticky, but not glossy and wet. No dry flour should be left on the bottom of the bowl. If the dough is too dry (lots of little pieces, dry flour left in the bowl), add a tablespoon or two of milk. If the dough is too wet (very sticky or glossy), add some of the reserved flour.

Sweet potato biscuits being cut out of the dough using a glass

Use some of the reserved flour to liberally dust a work surface. Turn the dough out onto the floured surface and press it down into a 1-inch thick circle. Use a biscuit cutter or glass to cut biscuits out of the dough (my glass was 3-inches in diameter). Gather up the scraps, press it down again, and cut more biscuits. Repeat until no more biscuits can be cut.

Sweet potato biscuits ready to bake on a parchment lined baking sheet

Place the biscuits on a parchment lined baking sheet. Transfer to the oven and bake for about 20 minutes, or until the are golden brown.

Baked sweet potato biscuits on a baking sheet

Serve the sweet potato biscuits while warm. The golden brown color can be kind of masked by their orange hue, so make sure to check closely as you get close to 20 minutes! 

Maple syrup being poured onto a buttered sweet potato biscuit

I like mine with butter (yes, more butter) and just a little maple syrup for extra autumn-y goodness.

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  1. These are my go to biscuits! They freeze well and are always a hit. I do end up adding close to 1 cup of flour because my dough is always so sticky. Make these biscuits; they do not disappoint!

  2. These were a total crowd pleaser, and my crowd is picky! Ate them warm with some homemade cinnamon butter and can’t wait to have the leftovers for breakfast. Yum!! This one is a keeper! 

  3. These were so simple to make and so delicious! The recipe was also very straightforward to follow. Thank you so much for including photos of the process, many recipes writers do not. This will be something I will keep revisiting and making for sure! I also ran out of whole milk and used 2/3 cup oat milk and they still turned out just fine :-)

    1. I haven’t tried that so I can’t say for sure, but I think almond milk has less fat than whole milk, which might affect the texture of the biscuit.

      1. Thank u clarifying. I thought since someone from previous comment stated they used oat milk I could try almond. 

  4. I’ve made these so many times and they are always a hit! Always the first to go and everyone asks for the recipe.  I especially love pairing them with honey cinnamon butter along side your kale and chorizo frittata for a delicious  and unforgettable brunch. 

  5. Have made these dozens of times – always incredible. Have recently substituted oat milk and it still worked perfectly. Thank you Beth and team – we LOVE these!

  6. A great addition to our Thanksgiving dinner! First time making biscuits from scratch too. I made the dough the day before and froze the unbaked biscuits, then just popped them in the oven straight from the freezer about 25 min before we were ready to eat. Totally recommend as a make-ahead holiday meal component.

  7. About to make these for the first time! Process was super simple and easy to follow. I’m thinking of trying out the japanese purple sweet potatoes next time :D!

  8. Just made these. I had some leftover buttermilk from another recipe on this site so I just used that in place of the normal milk. I always get worried about adding too much flour in recipes like this so I just left my dough a little shaggy and made a flattened drop biscuit rustic-y shape (also might have been a tad lazy). They turned out great!

  9. SO GOOD! My first crack at making biscuits and I LOVED them! I made up a bunch of breakfast sandwiches with scrambled egg and cheddar cheese and froze them and they microwaved so well. This is my new favorite breakfast! Thank you!!